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CurEat Craft Cocktails Like a Boss (or CurEater)

In Raleigh, NC, it feels like we skipped over spring and steam rolled right into summer. That being said, you’ll find us drinking fresh, craft cocktails on breezy patios or in cool (cold) bars. This spring/summer whether you’re in the mood to go out and socialize with a big group or pick up some beer for your backyard barbecue, we know exactly where and what you should be getting.

For the person who wants to hit the town…
The Punch Room
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Image via The Punch Room

Located inside the Ritz Carlton hotel in downtown Charlotte, The Punch Room is the perfect place to grab craft cocktails made by CurEater and master mixologist, Bob Peters. He is a Charlotte native and winner of the 2015 Global Bartender of the Year for the Ritz Carlton, is the head mixologist at the Punch Room. Thanks to Bob, the charlotte beverage scene is on the up and up, and all we can say is that you don’t want to miss out.

What to get?

Roman Punch: Brandy, Dark Rum, Lemon, Raspberry Syrup, a Splash of Port and Prosecco.
For the beer-loving barbecue master…  
Tasty Beverage Co.
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Image via Citizen Times

If you’re throwing a porch party or a hosting barbecue this season in Raleigh or Asheville, NC, might we suggest picking up some beverages from CurEater Johnny Belflower’s Tasty Beverage Co. Tasty Beverage Co. has locations in Raleigh and Asheville and is dedicated completely to beer. The best part? You can place an order online for pickup or delivery. Game changer.

What to get?

Jam Band Berry Ale: It’s a fruit wheat beer with blueberry, red raspberry and tart cherry flavors.
For the DIY cocktail lover…
Crude Bitters

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If you’re the type that loves to make your own cocktail, we have the ingredient that will crush your cocktail game. CurEater Craig Rudewicz’s Crude Bitters, a North Carolina-based cocktail bitters company creates handcrafted bitters and syrups that are just the thing to take your craft cocktails to the next level. The Crude Bitters website features a recipe section, and we’ve found the perfect spring, craft cocktail recipe and we’re passing it on so you can turn those 

What to make?

Ol’ Rita: with Tequila, Lime Juice, Orange Juice, Cointreau, Crude Bitter, Marriage bitters and one drop of “Tiki” bitters
For the day drinker/bruncher…
The Lakewood Restaurant
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Image via The Lakewood

CurEater Phoebe Lawless’ The Lakewood Restaurant is the place to go on the weekends for crisp, craft cocktails. You can enjoy a house cocktail at the bar or grab a table on the rooftop for bites and drinks. One of the coolest parts? The Lakewood is in a historic building that was home to Durham, NC’s Davis Baking Co. for more than 60 years! Our personal favorite is the tin ceiling! 

What to get?

Fizz:  Aperol, egg white, lemon and soda

Meet Asheville CurEater East Fork Pottery

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When we choose our CurEaters, we not only look for great chefs and bartenders, we also look for creatives and artisan craft-makers in a community. Founded by Alex Matisse and Connie Matisse in 2010, East Fork Pottery was one of our first artisan CurEaters. This month they celebrated the one-year anniversary of their brick-and-mortar, so we thought it was hight time we introduce you. *Huge thanks to Connie Matisse for taking the time to give us so much detail!*

What inspired you to create East Fork Pottery?

I moved to Madison County in 2008, after the financial crisis and my first real, big girl breakup sent me packing my bags and heading out of New York City with no plans.  I took a job doing seasonal work on a goat farm and met Alex while I was selling cheese at the Mars Hill Holiday Market in the basement of an antique store.  He’d just bought the little house and property at the end of Ras Grooms Road and had big plans to start a pottery.  I had no idea what “starting a pottery” meant, but I was in love and I didn’t care.

east fork pottery, asheville, visit asheville, north carolina pottery, pottery, matisseHow long has Alex been honing his craft/art?

Alex has been working with clay since he was six – he’s never bothered messing with any other mediums. East Fork Pottery was something that’d been developing within him for a long, long time, inspired both by his affinity for clay and for his desire to put some distance between himself and the big, tough-to-get-out-from-under shadows cast by Henri Matisse and his legacy.  Now, with Alex, John and I each bringing our own skillsets, personal histories, and interests to the mix, East Fork Pottery has become a dynamic, complicated, ever-morphing organism with a mission of bringing beautiful, lasting dinnerware to the table.

east fork pottery, asheville, visit asheville, north carolina pottery, pottery, matisseWho was your biggest influence?

Definitely can’t narrow this down to one! Alex and John set on this path largely because of the potter’s they trained under: Matt Jones, Mark Hewitt, and Daniel Johnston.  Now, though, we draw influence from everywhere.  Alex has his hand on the pulse of modern luxury e-commerce brands, John’s got his nose deep in finance books, and a lot of my influence comes from the fashion world, growing up in Los Angeles – a big, diverse, global city – and the fact that my own family placed high value on hospitality social justice, and community engagement.

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How does it feel knowing people are eating off East Fork pottery plates at restaurants in Asheville?

It feels amazing! Especially amazing since the restaurants that use our dinnerware are all places that we love, run by people we love.  People come into the store after eating at Cúrate or Gan Shan or Table and say, “We found you because we just couldn’t help but turn over our plates to see who made them.” I just love that.

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Speaking of restaurants, when Steve approached you about CurEat, what were your initial thoughts about CurEat?

I thought CurEat was a genius idea.  I’d actually just had a terrible experience with Yelp, trying to get them to change the East Fork Pottery listing from “Paint Your Own Pottery” to “Home Decor”, so when Steve told me about CurEat, I was grateful for a reason to never have to go on Yelp again. Social Media is such a weird, complicated space, and CurEat makes it so that you can take dining advice from people who’ve already earned your trust.

Out of all your CurEat lists, which list would you say is your favorite?

I most often point people to my “7am to 1am in Asheville” list.  We have so many great places to eat in Asheville, but most of my favorites get very little press coverage.  I love to invite people visiting Asheville to eat where the chefs eat.

How would you describe your palate?

With any meal, I’m always seeking balance: I like rich, fatty red meat cut with bright, light, high-acid red wine and a bitter green salad. Spicy foods tempered with sweetness, like in Thai and Korean cuisines (sweet meats!). And I love really well-executed, classic French and Italian country cooking. 

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Coffee or cocktail?

No offense meant to all my craft cocktail friends out there, but the only cocktails I really mess with are Negronis, Margaritas, and Martinis – classics get classic for a reason! But I’ll drink wine 9.5 out of 10 times.  I start my day with a big mug of Hu-Kwa with milk and honey, a black tea smoked over pine from imported by the Mark T Wendell Company (we sell it at eastforkpottery.com – wink, wink)

As an artist, who do you admire in the food community in Asheville or in general?

I really admire my friend Jacob Sessoms, who opened Table in 2005 and has stuck hard to his commitment to local produce and a seasonal menu before it became trendy. I just had the pleasure of meeting Jana Gravner, a winemaker in Friuli making some of the most interesting experimental wines, all aged in clay amphora.  I think everyone thinking of opening a restaurant – or any business – should eat at Gramercy Tavern and listen to everything Danny Meyer has to say about treating your customers with dignity and graciousness.  And Pete Wells, restaurant critic at the NY Times, is a genius.

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If someone had to choose one restaurant from your Asheville list, which one would you recommend?

Cucina 24.  The chef-owner, Brian Canipelli, is terrible at self-promotion (sorry, Brian. You know it’s true), but his food is just so mature and beautiful.  He’s so good at vegetales. All the pasta is made in house and is always perfectly toothsome, sauced with a considerate hand. The bulk of the produce he uses is grown by our friend and farmer, Evan Chender, who grows the most exquisite food – all sorts of lesser known herbs, almost extinct varieties of radicchio and treviso, etc.  And everything is served on East Fork.

What was your favorite meal growing up?

Most people who know me know that my mom, Terrie Coady, is never not throwing a party.  She’s an incredible cook and can make anything.  But every year on my birthday I asked for the same thing: stuffed manicotti with red sauce and a whole lotta cheese.